Advocacy Project (Final)

•October 18, 2010 • Leave a Comment

Click here: Advocacy Paper

Advertisements

Advocacy Project (Rough Draft)

•October 12, 2010 • Leave a Comment

Click link: Englush paper real

“If Congress Stalls, Do Stocks Rise?” (Final Final)

•October 11, 2010 • Leave a Comment

            Every team needs a captain, someone to make the crucial decisions that will lead the whole team to victory. That one person has the ability to change a losing record into a playoff berth. Without that leader, failure is inevitable. In Jeff Sommer’s article “If Congress Stalls, Do Stocks Rise?” he warns the public of the possible outcome that may occur if governmental gridlock becomes a reality. Through the use of examples and rhetorical devices, Sommer argues the negatives of governmental gridlock and urges voter cooperation. Continue reading ‘“If Congress Stalls, Do Stocks Rise?” (Final Final)’

Proposal

•October 7, 2010 • Leave a Comment

Obesity is a problem that has been plaguing the U.S for years now. It has been increasing year after year and it shows no signs of slowing down anytime soon. I would like to talk about different possibilities that are making these numbers increase. We all know that the problem lies in the food but how does it get there and how can it be avoided? I would like to propose the question of, who is at fault. I think there are numerous things that all generally lead to bad eating options and habits. I chose this topic because it is universal and applies to mostly everyone. Also, because I think that this subject is very interesting and can be useful for future references.

The New York Times seems to address this topic rather frequently. Who’s to blame them, health related diseases have shortened the life expectancy of many and killed thousands. New York is a huge city, just like Chicago, and I am sure theAy have heath related problems just as well. The New York Times attempts to inform the readers which is a great thing.

Ultimately, I plan on answering the question, what is obesity, whose fault is it how can it be stopped? The New York Times will be a great reverence in helping me answer my questions.

If Congress Stalls, Do Stocks Rise? (Final)

•October 5, 2010 • Leave a Comment

            Every team needs a captain, someone to make the crucial decisions that will lead the whole team to victory. That one person has the ability change a losing record into a playoff berth. Without that leader, failure is inevitable. In Jeff Sommer’s article “If Congress Stalls, Do Stocks Rise?” he warns the public of the possible outcome that may occur if governmental gridlock becomes a reality. Through the use of examples and rhetorical devices, Sommer attempts to convey his message in a feeble manner. Continue reading ‘If Congress Stalls, Do Stocks Rise? (Final)’

If Congress Stalls, Do Stocks Rise?

•September 28, 2010 • 1 Comment

                Every team needs a captain, someone to make the crucial decisions that will lead the whole team to victory. That one person has the ability change a losing record into a playoff berth. Without that leader, failure is inevitable. In Jeff Sommer’s article “If Congress Stalls, Do Stocks Rise?” he warns the public of the possible outcome that may occur if governmental gridlock becomes a reality. Through the use of examples and rhetorical devices, Sommer attempts to convey his message in a feeble manner. Continue reading ‘If Congress Stalls, Do Stocks Rise?’

Can The Fed Offer A Reason To Cheer?

•September 21, 2010 • Leave a Comment

Cowen, Tyler. “Can the Fed Offer a Reason to Cheer?” The New York Times 19 Sept. 2010: 5. Print.

Cowan argues that lack of trust from the American people and congress is keeping the United States idle in its quest for economic stability. Through the use of logic and subtle optimism, Cowan proves the latter without being overly dramatic and didactic. The purpose for his writing is to convince Americans and congress to trust, also to get Mr. Bernanke to take a chance, not being “afraid to fail.”His directed audience is Americans with spending money, the stubborn congressmen, and the Federal Reserve.